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Bicentennial Woords

Bicentennial Woods

This is hill country, carved by the glaciers and covered with towering oaks, hickories and sycamores, some more than 200 years old. A variety of woodland birds can be seen and heard in spring and summer. Spring wildflowers include wild blue phlox, wild geranium, bloodroot and Jack-in-the-pulpit

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Blue Cast Springs

Blue Cast Springs

Blue Cast Springs protects over 3,000 feet of the Maumee River bank and is the site of a natural spring once thought to have healthful properties. Bluffs 30-feet high offer vistas of the Maumee River and one of its islands. Native Americans likely used these bluffs to overlook the river’s canoe traffic. A number of …

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Cypress Meadow

Cypress Meadow

Cypress trees stand on low land surrounding the water of a pond. There are also willow and cottonwood trees. Northern white oak, ash and black walnut have been planted in the land around the pond. The varied habitat provides a variety of wildflowers and birds.

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Fogwell Forest

Fogwell Forest

Fogwell Forest is in a lowland area southwest of Fort Wayne. It’s a bit of old-growth forest, with giant oak and beech trees. In the shade beneath the giants are flowering dogwood and pawpaw and an impressive display of wildflowers in spring. The preserve is the year-round home of squirrels, raccoons and great horned owls.

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Fox Fire Woods

Fox Fire Woods is high, well-drained land producing a woodland where the dominant trees are oak and hickory. Along the west side are wild plum and hawthorn trees. The Fox Fire name is from a fungus that grows on decaying vegetation on the woodland floor and glows eerily in the dark.

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The Herman F. Hammer Wald Nature Preserve is in various stages of forest succession. There’s a field that was cultivated and now has scattered ash, red maple, hawthorn, basswood, elm, black walnut and hop hornbeam — trees of early succession. There’s a mature forest of beech, hickory, sugar maple, tulip, cherry and oak trees. The variety of trees and stages of …

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This is a floodplain forest where the drainage divides among the Eel, Wabash, St. Joseph and Maumee Rivers. There are wet areas, except during periods of drought, and old stream meanders. Jack-in-the-pulpit and ferns are common, and an unusual wildflower growing here is green dragon. Read more about why ACRES temporarily closed this preserve to protect our region’s natural areas from …

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The Little Wabash River Nature Preserve is a place of trees. The land donor constructed a pond and planted cedar, cottonwood and willow trees around it. River birch grow along the trail, as well as scattered northern white oak and red maple on the higher ground. Interspersed are spruce, basswood, hickory, beech, elm, tulip, black cherry, sweetgum, dogwood, sumac and bald cypress …

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The Maumee River Overlook is a high forested embankment overlooking the Maumee River. A water-powered sawmill was once located nearby on an outcrop of rocks in the river. Lumber from the mill was used in the Wabash & Erie Canal, which ran along the south border of the preserve.

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This preserve protects a picturesque high south bank of the St. Joseph River, ravines of Davis Fisher Creek and an old-growth maple woods where a maple sugar camp operated for many years. There are still remnants of the sugar camp. The woods have sugar maple, tulip, red and white oak, beech, ash and sycamore. Spring brings a carpet of wildflowers beneath the trees …

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By the Numbers

70+
miles of trails, open dawn to dusk